Restaurant Style Buffalo WingsIt’s Super Bowl Sunday, which is another wonderful food holiday as far as I’m concerned.   So, for today, I’m throwing my diet out the window and frying some chicken wings.  I’ll have to run every day this week to make up for it, but it’ll be worth it.
 
There are few things I like more than good hot wings.  My favorite wings come from Buffalo Wild Wings (BW3s), but the closest restaurant is 45 minutes away from me.  I’ve found that this method gives me wings that are just as good, if not better than, wings from a restaurant.  I buy fresh wings (not frozen), cut off the tips and cut the remaining wing into wings and drumsticks.  I did cheat and use Franks RedHot Buffalo Wing Sauce instead of making a sauce from scratch.  Maybe next time.  Use whichever sauce you prefer or make your own.  I also dust the wings in seasoned flour before frying.  This helps to make them crispy and adhere the sauce to the wings without being heavy or greasy.

Restaurant Style Hot Wings

4 lb fresh (not frozen) chicken wings
1 c flour
2 tsp salt
1 tsp pepper
1 tsp paprika
vegetable oil
1 bottle wing sauce
Ranch or bleu cheese dressing (for serving)
Celery and carrot sticks (for serving)
Lots of friends to eat your amazing wings (or a couple teenagers)
 
Heat your frying oil.  If using a deep fryer, preheat the oil to 375 degrees.  If pan frying, pour about an inch of oil into a frying pan (a cast iron skillet works well for this).  Let the oil heat on medium while you’re prepping the wings.
 
Rinse the wings under cold water.  Remove wing tips and cut wings into wings and drumsticks.  Cut through the joints for best results.  Discard wing tips.
 
In a mixing bowl, combine the dry ingredients.  Toss the wings and drumsticks in the seasoned flour until lightly coated.  Using metal tongs, shake off any excess flour and place the wings in the hot oil.  The oil should “sing” when the wings are added (meaning it should boil rapidly).  If it isn’t singing yet, remove the wing and give it a few more minutes to heat up.  Fry the wings for about 4 minutes on each side (8-10 minutes total if you’re using a deep fryer).  Keep an eye on the oil.  If it starts to boil too violently, turn the heat down slightly.  If it isn’t boiling enough, turn the heat up slightly.  The wings should be a light golden brown when done.  Remove the wings with a clean pair of metal tongs and place on paper towels to soak up any excess oil.
 
**Due to the possibility of food born illness when handling raw poultry, I recommend using one pair of tongs for handling raw chicken and a separate clean pair of tongs for handling cooked chicken to avoid the risk of cross contamination.**
 
You will probably have to cook the wings in several batches (4 lbs is a lot of chicken wings).  Keep in mind that the oil temperature drops every time you add new wings.  Give the oil a few minutes to come back up to temperature between batches.  This will ensure your wings are cooked thoroughly and won’t absorb too much excess oil.
 
Place the fried wings in a mixing bowl and add the wing sauce.  It’s best to add a little at a time and use the tongs or a large spoon to turn the wings and ensure they are coated with sauce.  Serve warm with ranch or bleu cheese dressing and celery and carrot sticks.

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Restaurant Style Hot Wings

Prep Time 10 minutes


Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes
Author The Not So Modern Housewife

Ingredients

  • 4 lb fresh not frozen chicken wings
  • 1 c flour
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp pepper
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • lard for frying
  • 1 bottle wing sauce
  • Ranch or bleu cheese dressing for serving
  • Celery and carrot sticks for serving
  • Lots of friends to eat your amazing wings or a couple teenagers

Instructions

  1. Heat your lard. If using a deep fryer, preheat the oil to 375 degrees. If pan frying, pour about an inch of oil into a frying pan (a cast iron skillet works well for this). Let the oil heat on medium while you're prepping the wings.
  2. Rinse the wings under cold water. Remove wing tips and cut wings into wings and drummies. Cut through the joints for best results. Discard wing tips.
  3. In a mixing bowl, combine the dry ingredients. Toss the wings and drummies in the seasoned flour until lightly coated. Using metal tongs, shake off any excess flour and place the wings in the hot oil. The oil should "sing" when the wings are added (meaning it should boil rapidly). If it isn't singing yet, remove the wing and give it a few more minutes to heat up. Fry the wings for about 4 minutes on each side (8-10 minutes total if you're using a deep fryer). Keep an eye on the oil. If it starts to boil too violently, turn the heat down slightly. If it isn't boiling enough, turn the heat up slightly. The wings should be a light golden brown when done. Remove the wings with a clean pair of metal tongs and place on paper towels to soak up any excess oil.
  4. You will probably have to cook the wings in several batches (4 lbs is a lot of chicken wings). Keep in mind that the oil temperature drops every time you add new wings. Give the oil a few minutes to come back up to temperature between batches. This will ensure your wings are cooked thoroughly and won't absorb too much excess oil.
  5. Place the fried wings in a mixing bowl and add the wing sauce. It's best to add a little at a time and use the tongs or a large spoon to turn the wings and ensure they are coated with sauce. Serve warm with ranch or bleu cheese dressing and celery and carrot sticks.

Recipe Notes

**Due to the possibility of food born illness when handling raw poultry, I recommend using one pair of tongs for handling raw chicken and a separate clean pair of tongs for handling cooked chicken to avoid the risk of cross contamination.**



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