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What to Plant in November in Florida: 25+ Must-Have Plants for Your Florida Garden

As proud Floridians, we deeply appreciate the joys and challenges of gardening in our beautiful state. With our unique climate and diverse regional variations, November brings exciting planting possibilities throughout Florida, from north to south.

Ah, November in Florida. While our northern neighbors are shivering in their boots and bundling up in scarves, we’re still enjoying our sunglasses and shorts!

Our state’s subtropical climate keeps us warmer than most of the country, with average high temperatures ranging from the mid-60s in the Panhandle to the low 80s in the Keys. Mornings can be a bit brisk (we’re talking 50s and 60s here, not exactly arctic), but by afternoon, it’s typically perfect weather for a T-shirt and a pair of flip-flops. And let’s not forget the drop in humidity – we’ve all earned that after a steamy summer!

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It’s this unique weather pattern that gives us Floridians an exciting range of plant options to spruce up our homestead gardens in November. The diversity of Florida vegetables, including eggplant, okra, southern peas, and summer/winter squash, can thrive in our state’s unique climate, attracting good bugs for natural pest control.

In this post, we will explore everything you need to know about vegetable planting in November, including succession planting and selecting the best seeds and transplants for each region. If you’re wondering what to plant in November in Florida, get ready for a delightful journey that will ignite your green thumb and help your garden thrive beyond your expectations!

Succession Planting

Succession vegetable planting is a technique that allows gardeners to maximize their harvest throughout the season by planting several crops in sequence. This can be done by seed or transplant, either planting the same crop multiple times or planting different crops that mature at different rates.

In Florida, November is an excellent time for succession planting, as the weather is cooler and offers a more hospitable environment for a variety of crops. Some popular options for succession planting in November include lettuce, kale, broccoli, radishes, and specifically radish, spinach, Swiss chard, which are known to thrive in the Florida winter, accommodating the different growing conditions across the region.

Plan what veggies you want to grow early in the season so you are always ready to plant the next crop as the previous one is harvested. This way, you can have a continuous supply of fresh produce throughout the winter months.

Harvesting

As you plan your November garden, make sure to account for any crops that are still growing, and harvest those that are reaching their peak ripeness. This will not only ensure that you have a constant supply of fresh produce, but it will also make room for your next succession crop. Plus, harvesting at the peak of ripeness means more flavorful and nutritious vegetables for your table!

Some crops that might be ready for harvest in November in Florida include sweet potatoes, tomatoes, beans, peppers, and eggplants. Quick-growing growing crops such as carrots, lettuce, peas, and radishes will also be ready to harvest throughout the month.

Don’t forget to also check for any pests or diseases that may be affecting your plants, and take appropriate action to protect your garden.

Watering

November brings varying rainfall patterns, ranging from days of zero rainfall to heavy showers, making it crucial to closely monitor your garden’s water requirements and adapt your watering schedule accordingly. As humidity levels decrease and the air becomes drier, it’s easy to overlook the need to ensure your plants remain adequately hydrated.

During this time of year, when the weather can be unpredictable, I find myself relying most heavily upon drip irrigation set on a timer. This method allows for slow, deep water penetration into the soil, ensuring that the roots receive the necessary moisture to grow, without the risk of overwatering or underwatering.

By implementing this watering technique, you can confidently navigate through November, providing your garden with the optimal hydration it needs to thrive even in the face of changing weather conditions.

Fertilizing

When it’s winter in Florida and your gardens are thriving, it’s important to make sure your plants get the right fertilization. For gardens in the ground, a monthly feeding schedule is recommended. This way, your plants get a steady supply of nutrients for optimal growth. Just remember that different plants might have different needs, so it’s essential to consider that and adjust accordingly.

Now, let’s talk about container gardens. Since they have limited soil volume and more frequent watering, you might need to fertilize more often. A weekly schedule is often recommended to keep those essential nutrients flowing. You might want to try slow-release fertilizers for containers too. They release nutrients gradually, ensuring your plants get a balanced diet over time.

If you’re not a fan of commercial fertilizers, there are alternatives you can explore. Topdressing your garden with compost is one option. It enriches the soil with organic matter and slowly releases nutrients as it breaks down. Another option is using compost tea or liquid organic fertilizers. You can apply them directly to the soil or as foliar sprays. They not only provide nutrients but also promote soil health and microbial activity, making your garden thrive.

By following these fertilization practices, you’ll keep your garden healthy and vibrant while being sustainable and environmentally friendly. And don’t forget to keep an eye on your plant’s growth and adjust the feeding schedule as needed. They’ll thank you with optimal performance!

Nematode Control

Nematodes are tiny parasites that can wreak havoc on your garden if left unchecked. Florida soils are particularly susceptible to nematodes, so it’s crucial to take preventative measures. You can start by planting nematode-resistant varieties of plants and rotating your crops to avoid infestation. Another useful technique is solarization, where you cover the soil with a black plastic sheet in the hot sun for several weeks, effectively killing off any nematodes.

If you do end up with a nematode problem, don’t panic! There are methods to mitigate their damage. Soil solarization can also be used to reduce nematode populations, as well as incorporate beneficial nematodes into your soil. These microscopic organisms feed on harmful nematodes and are a natural and environmentally friendly solution.

Remember to always monitor your garden for signs of nematode infestation and take action immediately if necessary. Don’t let these pesky parasites ruin your beautiful garden!

What Vegetables to Plant in North Florida

Welcome, November! In North Florida, this month typically ushers in a shift in weather patterns, marking the transition from a hot, humid summer to a milder and relatively cooler winter season. Average temperatures range from a high of 70 degrees Fahrenheit to lows around 50 degrees, providing a more pleasant and conducive environment for a variety of plants.

Rainfall decreases significantly from the summer months, averaging about two inches for the whole calendar month. This shift means you’ll need to adjust your watering practices to ensure your plants are getting just the right amount of water.

As for what to plant? Cool-season vegetables such as broccoli, lettuce, carrots, bulbing onions, and bunching onions thrive in these conditions. It’s also the perfect time to sow wildflower seeds – they’ll germinate as the soil temperatures and rainfall increase to bloom beautifully in the warmer months.

Here are some other seed ideas for what to plant:

What to Transplant:

  • Arugula

  • Beets

  • Broccoli

  • Brussels Sprouts

  • Cabbage

  • Cauliflower

  • Chinese Cabbage

  • Collards

  • Endive

  • Kale

  • Kohlrabi

  • Mustard

  • Swiss Chard

Seeds to Plant:

  • Carrots

  • Celery

  • Onions (bulb, green, & shallots)

  • Radish

  • Spinach

  • Turnips

What to Plant in Central Florida

Now onto Central Florida, where the climate starts to take a slight twist. November here is a mixed bag of moderately warm days and slightly cooler nights. The daytime temperatures in Central Florida typically hover in the mid-70s, dropping to the mid-50s at night. You can finally say goodbye to those blistering summer afternoons!

Interestingly, November is also one of the driest months in Central Florida, with rainfall averaging less than two inches. This shift in weather calls for a change in your garden routine, folks! You’ll need to keep a keen eye on your soil moisture levels, ensuring it’s neither too dry nor soggy.

When it comes to planting, Central Florida in November is a haven for an exciting range of vegetables and herbs. You can continue planting cool-season crops like broccoli, lettuce, cauliflower, and celery but also begin seeds of some warm-season vegetables such as peppers and potatoes. They’ll get a good start in the cool weather and then burst into growth as the temperature starts to climb.

What to Transplant:

  • Arugula

  • Beets

  • Broccoli

  • Brussels Sprouts

  • Cabbage

  • Cauliflower

  • Chinese Cabbage

  • Collards

  • Endive

  • Kale

  • Kohlrabi

  • Lettuce

  • Mustard

  • Swiss Chard

Seeds to Plant:

  • Carrots

  • Celery

  • Onions (green & shallots)

  • Peas (English & Snap)

  • Peppers

  • Potatoes

  • Radish

  • Spinach

  • Turnips

What to Plant in South Florida

South Florida, you’re up next! Your November weather is truly something special. With daytime temperatures typically dancing around the low-80s and nights cooling down to the mid-60s, it’s your turn to flaunt your gardening prowess. Not to mention, your rainfall averages about 3 inches – just the right amount to keep those plants happy without making them waterlogged.

So, what’s the scoop for South Florida gardening in November? Let me tell you, it’s a vegetable bonanza! Yes, you heard it right. November is a great time to transplant cool-season crops like cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, Swiss chard, and turnips. Don’t forget about the leafy greens like kale, collards, and lettuce. They will love the cooler night temperatures.

But wait, there’s more! You could also start planting a range of warm-season crops, including southern peas, alongside your dreams of a bountiful tomato harvest, winter squash, or some spicy jalapenos to kick up your salsa game. Now is your time.

What to Transplant:

  • Cabbage

  • Cauliflower

  • Chinese Cabbage

  • Collards

  • Eggplant

  • Endive

  • Kale

  • Lettuce

  • Mustard

  • Peppers

  • Strawberries

  • Swiss Chard

  • Tomatoes

Seeds to Plant:

  • Beans (bush, pole, & lima)

  • Carrots

  • Celery

  • Corn (sweet)

  • Cucumber

  • Onions (green & shallots)

  • Peas (English & Southern)

  • Potatoes

  • Radish

  • Spinach

  • Summer Squash

  • Winter Squash

  • Turnips

Final Thoughts

Timing is crucial, especially when it comes to gardening in Florida’s unique climate. Our state’s scorching heat, unexpected cold snaps, and occasional torrential rainfall can greatly impact your crops. Planting at the right time is key to a successful harvest.

But don’t worry, November in Florida offers exciting gardening opportunities. Whether you’re transplanting cool-season crops or sowing warm-season ones, there are endless possibilities. So grab your gardening gloves and get ready to enjoy the fantastic weather and delicious produce that Florida has to offer.

As you prepare your garden for the upcoming winter months, let’s embrace new vegetable planting possibilities and savor the fruits of our labor together. By following these recommendations on what to plant in Florida during November, we’ll be on our way to a fruitful vegetable harvest. Happy gardening!

Mike Anderson

Friday 3rd of March 2017

Hello Bonnie, you are an incredible writer. This blog is amazing and very useful. These tips are very helpful for winter gardening. Thanks for sharing such tips.